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Context of 'June 2005-July 2005: Survey Suggests that Drug Industry Sales Reps Know Little about the Products they Sell'

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David Franklin later accuses drug company Parke-Davis of instructing its sales representatives to pressure doctors to prescribe the drug Neurontin for off-label uses. This marketing tactic is part of a larger effort aimed at increasing Neurontin prescriptions for uses not approved by the FDA (see 1996-2000). “I was trained to do things and did things that were blatantly illegal,” he says. “I knew my job was to falsely gain physicians’ trust and trade on my graduate degree.… I’d tell them we had physicians across the county, some involved in clinical trials, and others who had hundreds of patients on Neurontin, all getting an extraordinary response rate. We’d make them think everyone was using it but them.… [W]e were taking people who were moderately controlled on another drug and experimenting with Neurontin. We were gambling with people’s lives.” Franklin quits after two executives pressure him to get with the program. When Franklin tells one of them that he’s leaving, the executive warns, “I can’t guarantee what is going to happen to you or your career.” [Boston Globe, 3/12/2003]

Entity Tags: Pfizer, David Franklin, Parke-Davis

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

Abbott Laboratories, maker of the drug Hytrin, agrees to pay rival drug company Zenith Goldline Pharmaceuticals up to $42 million not to produce a generic version of Hytrin, a drug for high blood pressure and prostate enlargement. For three years Abbott, whose patent on Hytrin expired in 1995, has been fighting Zenith in court to prevent it from marketing a cheaper generic. Abbott currently earns about $500 million a year on the drug. After signing its agreement with Zenith, Abbott inks a similar deal with another rival, Geneva Pharmaceuticals, agreeing to pay that company as much as $101 million to keep its generic version of Hytrin off the market. Geneva and Abbott will abandon their agreement a year later when the federal government launches an antitrust investigation. Consumers will sue Abbott and Geneva charging that the companies’ agreement cost patients hundreds of millions dollars. [New York Times, 7/23/2000]

Entity Tags: Zenith Goldline Pharmaceuticals, Geneva Pharmaceuticals, Abbott Laboratories

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

Pierre Gaudet, owner of a 400-hectare organic soya farm and president of the Quebec Federation of Organic Producers, learns that four percent of his 60-ton crop contains genetically modified soya. His crop was apparently cross-pollinated by his neighbor’s fields. He loses $33,000 when he is forced to sell his contaminated crop on the conventional market, which pays only $190/ton compared to the $750/ton rate that is paid for organic soya. “There is no insurance for that. I can’t sue my neighbor—he followed all the rules,” Gaudet says. “All the companies tell us that cross-pollination [of soya] is impossible, so I didn’t take any special measures.” [Gazette (Montreal), 10/5/2002]

Entity Tags: Pierre Gaudet

Timeline Tags: Seeds

A survey of 483 physicians by GfK Market Measures finds that one-third feel drug company sales representatives are “too aggressive or pushy.” Roughly an equal percentage says that many reps are “not knowledgeable.” One general practitioner tells GfK, “It’s silly that a highly trained sales force does not know what their product is used for and they have to ask me.” According to the survey, drug companies Pfizer and Merck are considered by doctors to have the most effective marketing teams. Abbott Laboratories’ sales force is rated as the least effective. [CNN, 9/14/2005]

Entity Tags: GfK Market Measures, Merck, Abbott Laboratories, Pfizer

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) acknowledges it has funded a series of television advertisements in support of legislation primarily written by Max Baucus (D-MT), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, to reform US health care. The television ads are part of an agreement between the Obama administration, Baucus, and PhRMA in June, where the organization agreed to various givebacks and discounts designed to reduce America’s pharmaceutical spending by $80 billion over 10 years. PhRMA then set aside $150 million for advertising to support health care legislation. More progressive House Democrats such as Henry Waxman (D-CA) are pushing for stiffer drug industry givebacks than covered in the deal. PhRMA is led by Billy Tauzin, a former Republican congressman. Until recently, the organization spent some $12 million on ads by an offshoot coalition called Americans for Stable Quality Care, and aired television ads such as “Eight Ways Reform Matters to You.” PhRMA’s new ads will specifically support the Baucus bill. Many are critical of the deal, with James Love of the progressive research group Knowledge Ecology charging, “Essentially what the US got was not $80 billion, but $150 million in Obama campaign contributions.” [New York Times, 9/12/2009] Investigative reporter Matt Taibbi agrees with Love, accusing the White House of colluding with Baucus and Tauzin’s PhRMA to orchestrate a “big bribe” in exchange for the Democrats’ dropping of drug-pricing reform in the Baucus bill. Taibbi writes that in June, White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel met with representatives from PhRMA and drug companies such as Abbott Laboratories, Merck, and Pfizer to cut their deal. Tauzer later told reporters that the White House had “blessed” a plan involving the $150 million in return for the White House’s agreement to no longer back government negotiations for bulk-rate pharmaceuticals for Medicare, and to no longer support the importation of inexpensive drugs from Canada. Taibbi writes that the White House worked with Baucus and PhRMA to undercut Waxman’s attempts to give the government the ability to negotiate lower rates for Medicare drugs. PhRMA’s ads are being aired primarily in the districts of freshmen Democrats who are expected to face tough re-election campaigns, and in the districts of conservative “Blue Dog” Democrats, who have sided with Baucus, Obama, and PhRMA to oppose the Waxman provision in favor of PhRMA’s own provision, which would ban the government from negotiating lower rates for Medicare recipients. [True/Slant, 9/14/2009]

Entity Tags: James Love, Henry A. Waxman, Americans for Stable Quality Care, Abbott Laboratories, Rahm Emanuel, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, Senate Finance Committee, Obama administration, Medicare, Max Baucus, Matt Taibbi, Pfizer, Merck, W.J. (“Billy”) Tauzin

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

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