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Context of 'May 20, 1999: Vioxx Approved by FDA'

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Vice President Dan Quayle, chairman of the President’s Council on Competitiveness, and Louis Sullivan, secretary of health and human services, announce the FDA’s new policy on the regulation of genetically engineered foods. In the policy statement that is published three days later, the FDA will say it has determined that genetically modified (GM) foods are “substantially equivalent” to conventionally grown foods and therefore will not be subject to any special regulations. The agency justifies its position saying that assessments concerning the safety of food products should be based on the characteristics of the food product and not on the methods used to develop that product. [US Food and Drug Administration, 5/29/1992 pdf file] Specifically addressing the issue of labeling for GM foods, the May 29 statement will read: “The agency is not aware of any information showing that foods derived by these new methods differ from other foods in any meaningful or uniform way, or that, as a class, foods developed by the new techniques present any different or greater safety concern than foods developed by traditional plant breeding. For this reason, the agency does not believe that the method of development of a new plant variety… would… usually be required to be disclosed in labeling for the food.” Labeling would only be required in special cases, the FDA says. For example, if a genetically engineered tomato contains a peanut protein that is a proven allergen, a label will be needed. [US Food and Drug Administration, 5/29/1992, pp. 22991 pdf file] In their statement to the press, Sullivan says that biotechnology promises to develop new food products “that are tastier, more varied, more wholesome, and that can be produced more efficiently.” Quayle’s council played a key role in expediting the development of the policy. [Food and Drug Administration, 5/26/1992] Quayle explains that the policy will ensure the competitiveness of US firms. “The reforms we announce today will speed up and simplify the process of bringing better agricultural products, developed through biotech, to consumers, food processors, and farmers,” he says. “We will ensure that biotech products will receive the same oversight as other products, instead of being hampered by unnecessary regulation.” [New York Times, 1/25/2001]

Entity Tags: Dan Quayle, Louis Sullivan, US Food and Drug Administration

Timeline Tags: Seeds

In Geneva, at the 1998 World Health Assembly, delegates from the US State Department and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA ) threaten to withdraw funding for the World Health Organization (WHO) when members propose including a provision in its resolution on the Revised Drug Strategy that would urge countries “to ensure that public-health interests rather than commercial interests have ‘primacy’ in pharmaceutical and health policies.” As a result of the United States’ opposition, the statement is not adopted. The US also opposes a proposal to give the WHO a role in monitoring international trade agreements. [Consumer Project on Technology, 5/13/1998; Consumer Project on Technology, 10/16/1998; Wilson et al., 11/27/1999]

Entity Tags: World Health Organization, Clinton administration

Timeline Tags: Neoliberalism and Globalization

Merck submits its New Drug Application (NDA 21-042) to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Vioxx, which is intended to treat acute pain in adults, dysmenorrhea and osteoarthritis. The drug is supposed to cause fewer gastrointestinal problems than painkillers currently on the market. The NDA includes results from clinical studies that involved 5,400 subjects. [US Food and Drug Administration, 2005]

Entity Tags: US Food and Drug Administration, Merck

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

May 20, 1999: Vioxx Approved by FDA

The Food and Drug Administration approves Vioxx as a treatment for acute pain, dysmenorrhea, and osteoarthritis in adults, making the drug the second Cox-2 inhibitor available by prescription in the United States. [US Food and Drug Administration, 2005]

Entity Tags: US Food and Drug Administration

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

The Food and Drug Administration holds an advisory meeting on the VIGOR study, a clinical trial for the drug Vioxx, to assess whether there is a connection between the drug and heart problems. Unlike the VIGOR study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (see November 23, 2000), this group includes heart attacks 18, 19, and 20 (see March 2000) in their analysis. The meeting’s members conclude that there is not enough data to draw a solid conclusion. [US Food and Drug Administration, 3/8/2001; National Public Radio, 6/8/2006] Notwithstanding, they do recommend that physicians be informed that the VIGOR study showed “an excess of cardiovascular events in comparison to naproxen.” [Office of Representative Henry A. Waxman, 5/5/2005, pp. 21 pdf file] On March 7, the agency publishes all of the VIGOR data on its website, as well as its analysis. [US Food and Drug Administration, 3/8/2001]

Entity Tags: US Food and Drug Administration

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

The Food and Drug administration approves Vioxx for children who are over the age of 2 and have symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. [US Food and Drug Administration, 6/1/2005 pdf file] The approval is announced on September 8. [United Press International, 9/8/2004; Medical News Today, 9/9/2004]

Entity Tags: US Food and Drug Administration

Timeline Tags: US Health Care

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