!! History Commons Alert, Exciting News

Context of 'January 29-30, 1991: Iraq Attacks Saudi Target'

This is a scalable context timeline. It contains events related to the event January 29-30, 1991: Iraq Attacks Saudi Target. You can narrow or broaden the context of this timeline by adjusting the zoom level. The lower the scale, the more relevant the items on average will be, while the higher the scale, the less relevant the items, on average, will be.

January 29-30, 1991: Iraq Attacks Saudi Target

Iraqi forces attack Kharfji, Saudi Arabia, near the Saudi-Iraq border. [American Forces Press Service, 8/8/2000] The next day, US and coalition forces engage the Iraqis in the first major ground conflict of the war. [PBS Frontline, 1/9/1996]

Entity Tags: Iraq, US Department of Defense

Timeline Tags: Events Leading to Iraq Invasion

January 31, 1991: Iraq Captures Female US POW

Melissa Rathbun-Nealy at a rally in her home town of Grand Rapids, Michigan.Melissa Rathbun-Nealy at a rally in her home town of Grand Rapids, Michigan. [Source: Grand Rapids Public Library]During the fighting in and around Kharfji (see January 29-30, 1991), Iraqi forces capture the first US female prisoner of war. [American Forces Press Service, 8/8/2000] The POW is later identified as Army Specialist Melissa Rathbun-Nealy, a driver with the 233rd Transportation Company. She and fellow driver Specialist David Lockett became lost and stuck in the sand while driving a heavy flatbed truck near the Iraq-Kuwait border; both are captured. [People, 2/18/1991] Both Rathbun-Nealy and Lockett will be released in March 1991, along with four other POWs. Interestingly, both soldiers are initially listed as “missing in action” instead of “prisoners of war”; the Defense Department will give no explanation for the decision to list them as MIA, though some believe it is to escape potential media embarrassment at having a female soldier captured by the enemy. Both Rathbun-Nealy and Lockett will report that their captivity was largely uneventful, and they were well treated. [POW Network, 11/8/2007]

Entity Tags: US Department of the Army, David Lockett, Melissa Rathbun-Nealy

Timeline Tags: Events Leading to Iraq Invasion

The Defense Department announces the first troop withdrawals from Iraq and Kuwait, with the Army’s 24th Infantry Division, based at Fort Stewart, Georgia, the first to depart. [American Forces Press Service, 8/8/2000]

Entity Tags: US Department of the Army, US Department of Defense

Timeline Tags: Events Leading to Iraq Invasion

A Defense Department paper for a Camp David meeting with top Bush administration officials to take place the next day (see September 15, 2001) specifies three priority targets for initial action in response to the 9/11 attacks: al-Qaeda, the Taliban, and Iraq. It argues that of the three, al-Qaeda and Iraq pose a strategic threat to the US. Iraq’s alleged long-standing involvement in terrorism is cited, along with its interest in WMDs. [9/11 Commission, 7/24/2004, pp. 335, 559]

Entity Tags: US Department of Defense

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, Events Leading to Iraq Invasion

One hundred American and British warplanes attack Iraq’s H-3 airfield, a major air defense installation in western Iraq located far away from the Shia-populated areas that the US and Britain patrols are supposedly protecting. The attacks mark the first time jets have striked against a target in western Iraq while patrolling the southern “no-fly” zone. According to US central command, the operation—described by one newspaper as “the biggest single operation over the country [in] four years” —was launched in “response to recent Iraqi hostile acts against coalition aircraft monitoring the southern no-fly zone.” The US asserts that “coalition strikes in the no-fly zones are executed as a self defense measure in response to Iraqi hostile threats and acts against coalition forces and their aircraft.” The London Telegraph, however, reports that the operation “seemed designed to destroy air defenses to allow easy access for special forces helicopters to fly into Iraq via Jordan or Saudi Arabia to hunt down Scud missiles before a possible war within the next few months.” [Daily Telegraph, 9/6/2002; Statesman, 5/30/2005]

Timeline Tags: Events Leading to Iraq Invasion

Ordering 

Time period


Email Updates

Receive weekly email updates summarizing what contributors have added to the History Commons database

 
Donate

Developing and maintaining this site is very labor intensive. If you find it useful, please give us a hand and donate what you can.
Donate Now

Volunteer

If you would like to help us with this effort, please contact us. We need help with programming (Java, JDO, mysql, and xml), design, networking, and publicity. If you want to contribute information to this site, click the register link at the top of the page, and start contributing.
Contact Us

Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike