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Context of 'January 31, 2011: Chelsea Announces £70.9m Loss for Previous Season'

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Deloitte publishes its Football Money League rankings for the 2005-6 season. The rankings of the top 20 European clubs and their football earnings are:
(1) Real Madrid (€292.1m)
(2) Barcelona (€259.1m)
(3) Juventus (€251.2m)
(4) Manchester United (€242.6m)
(5) AC Milan (€238.7m)
(6) Chelsea (€221.0m)
(7) Internazionale (€206.6m)
(8) Bayern Munich (€204.7m)
(9) Arsenal (€192.4m)
(10) Liverpool (€176.0m)
(11) Lyon (€127.7m)
(12) Roma (€127.0m)
(13) Newcastle United (€124.3m)
(14) Schalke (€122.9m)
(15) Tottenham Hotspur (€107.2m)
(16) Hamburg (€101.8m)
(17) Manchester City (€89.4m)
(18) Rangers (€88.5m)
(19) West Ham United (€86.9m)
(20) Benfica (€85.1m) (Deloitte 2/2007 pdf file)

Chelsea announces the club lost £80.2m in the 2005-06 season. The loss is far less than the season before, when it was around £140m, but is still the third largest loss in the history of English football. Total losses over the three years since Roman Abramovich bought the club now exceed £300m. (Reuters 2/19/2007) Chelsea turned over €221m in the 2005-06 season (see February 2007).

Chelsea announces a loss of £74.8m for the 2007-08 football season. The figures show a 25 percent increase in turnover, to £190.5m, making the club second only to Manchester United in the Premier League, but the loss fell by only 7 percent compared to the previous season (see February 19, 2007). Chief executive Peter Kenyon allows that the club’s aim of breaking even by 2010 is “ambitious,” but adds: “I don’t think it’s something we are postponing, but it’s always been ambitious. We are determined to meet it, or get as close as we can.” (Kelso 2/22/2008) The club will actually make a loss of over £70m in the 2009-10 season (see January 31, 2011).

Chelsea announces that the club made a loss of £44m the previous season. This is the smallest loss since the football club was taken over by Roman Abramovich in 2003 and was achieved despite a fall in turnover from £213.1m to £206.4m. Chief executive Ron Gourlay comments, “It is still our aim to be self-sufficient and we will achieve this by increasing our revenues as we continue to leverage off our brand.” (Fifield 12/30/2009)

Chelsea announces a huge loss of £70.9m for the 2009-2010 football season, in which the club won the league and cup double. In the previous season the loss had been £44.4m (see December 30, 2009), although in the two years before that it was around £70m. Chelsea blames the loss on the amortization of player transfer fees, which means how much a player’s value in the accounts decreases over the length of his contract. Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck describes the results as “significant progress,” and cites what the club calls a “net cash inflow of £3.8m” as evidence. Buck says, “That the club was cash generative in the year when we recorded a historic Premier League and FA Cup double is a great encouragement and demonstrates significant progress as regards our financial results.” The same day as the loss is announced, Chelsea pays Liverpool a record £48m for Spanish striker Fernando Torres. (Fleming 2/1/2011)

Chelsea announce a loss of £67.7m for the 2010-2011 season, slightly less than the previous one (see January 31, 2011). There was a modest increase in revenues to £222.3m from £205.8m, thanks to Champions League and television income. Wages were down by £4.4m on last year and operating expenses down by £7m. The accounts contain an extraordinary item of £28m relating to the replacement of manager Carlo Ancelotti with André Villas-Boas in the summer. This means that Chelsea’s manager replacement costs have been around £64m in the last four years. In addition, the accounts reveal Chelsea paid £6.4m to Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs to settle claims arising from a failed tax avoidance scheme that involved paying players not salary, but compensation for use of their image rights. The size and repeated nature of the loss means that Chelsea may have difficulty complying with UEFA’s financial fair play regulations, although the consequences of this are unclear. (Gibson 2/8/2012)


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