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Context of 'September 18, 2010: Former Republican Senator Lambasts GOP Spokesman on Fox for ‘Nasty Racist’ Comments about African Laborers'

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US Postal Inspection Service logo.US Postal Inspection Service logo. [Source: Center for Regulatory Effectiveness]Special counsel John Danforth, heading the government’s probe into the 1993 Branch Davidian tragedy (see April 19, 1993 and September 7-8, 1999), names a group of US postal inspectors to investigate claims that the FBI tried to cover up its use of incendiary devices during the final assault on the Davidian compound. Preferring not to use FBI agents to investigate allegations against the bureau, Danforth said from the outset that he would use investigators from outside the Justice Department. “My basic thought is, the FBI should not be investigating the FBI,” Danforth said. Reporters laughed when someone suggested—facetiously—that US Postal Service “cops” could conduct the investigation. Now Danforth is bringing aboard some 80 postal inspectors to look into the allegations. The use of postal inspectors may indicate Justice Department officials could be targeted by the probe. Postal Inspection Service spokesman Robert Bethel acknowledges the choice of postal inspectors may seem odd to Americans unfamiliar with the agency. “A lot of people don’t know what a postal inspector is,” he says. “If they hear of postal inspectors, they think, is that someone who inspects post offices?” Postal inspectors have been investigating federal crimes involving the mails since 1772, and often investigate crimes such as extortion, child pornography, and on occasion murder, if they involve Postal Service employees. “We’ve always been called the ‘silent service,’ because we go about our business and don’t seek publicity,” Bethel says. The specific inspectors have not yet been chosen. In 1996, postal inspectors helped FBI investigators look into the events of the 1992 Ruby Ridge standoff (see August 31, 1992) and found evidence that an FBI official had obstructed justice. [All Points Broadcasting News, 10/2/1999]

Entity Tags: US Department of Justice, Branch Davidians, Robert Bethel, Federal Bureau of Investigation, John C. Danforth, US Postal Inspection Service

Timeline Tags: 1993 Branch Davidian Crisis

Jack Burkman, in a 2005 appearance on MSNBC.Jack Burkman, in a 2005 appearance on MSNBC. [Source: Postman Patel (.com)]In a debate on Fox News over whether the Post Office should continue to exist, Republican strategist Jack Burkman, who favors privatizing postal services, opens his remarks by saying most postal workers “should be driving cabs, and I think we should stop importing labor from Nigeria and Ethiopia, that’s about the skill level—they’re only in there because of massive union protection.” Attorney Tamara Holder chides Burkman for his “somewhat racist comments” about African immigrants, prompting Burkman to shout, “That’s crazy!” and laugh over Holder’s statement. Burkman reiterates his comment about “unskilled labor[ers]” driving taxicabs, and restates his opposition to the country “importing labor to drive cabs.” Former Republican Senator Alfonse D’Amato (R-NY) lambasts Burkman for his racism. “You are a nasty racist,” D’Amato says, and continues: “You brought in the fact that it’s a bunch of Nigerians.… Let me just tell you. That’s a bunch of bullsh_t. And you should be ashamed of yourself and have your mouth washed out. What the hell are you talking about?” When Burkman tries to interject, “We are importing—” D’Amato shouts over him, “It’s one thing to say that they’re out of control—wait a minute, shut up, I listened to your racist bullsh_t—it’s one thing to say that they’re hiring people who are unskilled, that they’re—that you can save money, that you can run it better, that it is inefficient, ineffective, and I agree to all of those things, but for you to bring in this bullsh_t about, oh, a bunch of Nigerians, etc., it’s out of line.” At this point, both Burkman and host Eric Bolling attempt to talk over D’Amato, but he refuses to stop speaking, adding: “And you hurt the cause, you hurt the cause, you hurt the cause of saying, ‘Guess what? A combination of private/public—a private/public partnership could do much better than what is being done now.’” Bolling allows Burkman to have the final word, and Burkman restates his contention that the Post Office employs “unskilled labor who should have been pushed down because of market reasons,” but who have had protection from unions and government; Bolling does not reiterate his statements about importing Nigerians and Ethiopians to perform unskilled tasks. [AmericaBlog, 9/18/2010]

Entity Tags: US Postal Service, Alfonse D’Amato, Jack Burkman, Eric Bolling, Tamara Holder, Fox News

Timeline Tags: Domestic Propaganda

Fox News commentator and analyst Juan Williams, in a column for the Washington, DC, political publication The Hill, writes of his dismay at what he believes is the racially charged rhetoric that is dominating the Republican presidential primary. Williams got into a heated exchange with Republican candidate Newt Gingrich during a recent debate in South Carolina (see January 16, 2012). But Williams is displeased with the responses of all of the candidates at the debate. “With [ethnic] solidly in the Democratic camp and behind the first black president,” Williams writes, “the scene is set for a bonanza of racial politics. The language of GOP racial politics is heavy on euphemisms that allow the speaker to deny any responsibility for the racial content of his message. The code words in this game are ‘entitlement society’—as used by Mitt Romney—and ‘poor work ethic’ and ‘food stamp president’—as used by Newt Gingrich. References to a lack of respect for the ‘Founding Fathers’ and the ‘Constitution’ also make certain ears perk up by demonizing anyone supposedly threatening core ‘old-fashioned American values.’ The code also extends to attacks on legal immigrants, always carefully lumped in with illegal immigrants, as people seeking ‘amnesty’ and taking jobs from Americans. But the code sometimes breaks down.” Williams, an African-American, asked each candidate at the debate about some aspect of racially driven politics, from voter identification laws that would keep African-Americans from voting to racial discrimination in drug enforcement policies. Gingrich, he writes, was the most flagrant in appealing to racist whites with his practiced, sophisticated use of “coded appeals”—“dog whistling,” Williams says it is often called—to racist stereotypes against blacks and Hispanics. Gingrich’s rhetoric, he writes, appeals to “certain white audiences by intimating that black people are lazy, happy to live off the government, and lacking any intellect.” Instead of answering Williams’s question (referring to Gingrich’s characterization of food stamp recipients as largely African-American and too lazy to seek gainful employment), Gingrich “threw red meat to Republicans in South Carolina, a state with a long history of racial politics. He used the same rhetorical technique of the segregationist politicians of the past: rejecting the premise of the question, attacking the media, and playing to the American people’s resentment of liberal elites, minorities, and poor people.” Williams says he does not regret asking Gingrich about his characterization of welfare recipients, and writes: “I do not know anyone on food stamps who would prefer them to gainful employment.… The problem is not a lack of work ethic on the part of the poor, who are disproportionately minorities. The problem is there are few good jobs for blue-collar people with the best work ethic. Let’s have an honest debate about why this is the case and what we can do to fix it. But I regret that our political discourse has become so fragmented and combative that the point I was trying to make was obscured by pro-wrestling theatrics and post-debate spin. Poverty, unemployment, and the hopelessness that pervade minority communities are real issues that the GOP nominee, and President Obama for that matter, should address in this campaign.” [The Hill, 1/30/2012] A blogger for the liberal Daily Kos writes of Williams’s column, “You have to wonder how long Juan Williams will last at Fox News” after writing the column. [Daily Kos, 1/30/2012]

Entity Tags: Fox News, Daily Kos, Newt Gingrich, Juan Williams

Timeline Tags: Domestic Propaganda, 2012 Elections

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