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Context of '9:59 a.m. September 11, 2001: Flight 93 Passenger Told of WTC Tower Collapse Contradicts Passenger Revolt Timing'

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Jeremy Glick.
Jeremy Glick. [Source: Family photo]Jeremy Glick calls his wife, Lyz, from Flight 93. He describes the hijackers as Middle Eastern- and Iranian-looking. According to Glick, three of them put on red headbands, stood up, yelled, and ran into the cockpit. He had been sitting in the front of the coach section, but he was then sent to the back with most of the passengers. Glick says the hijackers claimed to have a bomb, which looked like a box with something red around it. Family members immediately call emergency 9-1-1 on another line. New York State Police are patched in midway through the call. Glick finds out about the WTC towers. Two others onboard also learn about the WTC at about this time. Glick’s phone remains connected until the very end of the flight. (Mandel 9/16/2001; Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 10/28/2001; Longman 2002, pp. 143; MSNBC 7/30/2002)

On Flight 93, Jeremy Glick is still on the phone with his wife, Lyz. He tells her that the passengers are taking a vote if they should try to take over the plane or not. (Hillston 10/28/2001; Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 10/28/2001) He later says that all the men on the plane have voted to attack the hijackers. (Mandel 9/16/2001) When asked about weapons, he says they don’t have guns, just knives. This appears to contradict an earlier mention of guns. His wife gets the impression from him that the hijacker standing nearby, claiming to hold the bomb, would be easy to overwhelm. (Longman 2002, pp. 153-154)

According to Lyz Glick, as recounted in the book “Among the Heroes,” she is speaking to her husband Jeremy Glick on Flight 93 when he tells her that passengers have been hearing from other phone calls that planes are crashing into the World Trade Center. He asks her, “Are [the hijackers] going to blow this plane up?” Lyz replies that she doesn’t know, but tells him that it is true two planes have crashed into the World Trade Center. He asks her if they’re going to crash the plane into the World Trade Center. She replies, “No. They’re not going there.” He asks why, and she replies that one of the towers has just fallen. “They knocked it down.” The first World Trade Center tower collapses at 9:59 and is seen by millions on television. The book makes clear that this exchange takes place at “almost ten o’clock” —within a minute of the tower collapse. (Longman 2002, pp. 147) This account contradicts the 9/11 Commission’s conclusion that the passenger assault on the cockpit begins at 9:58, because the tower collapse was definitely at 9:59. Only later in the same phone call does Jeremy Glick mention that passengers are still taking a vote on whether or not to attack the hijackers. He confers with others and tells Lyz that they’ve decided to do so, and then gets off the phone line. (Longman 2002, pp. 153-54)


Potential pilots Don Greene and Andrew Garcia.
Potential pilots Don Greene and Andrew Garcia. [Source: Family photos]During this time, there apparently are no calls from Flight 93. Several cell phones that are left on record only silence. For instance, although Todd Beamer does not hang up, nothing more is heard after he puts down the phone, suggesting things are quiet in the back of the plane. (Longman 2002, pp. 218) The only exception is Richard Makely, who listens to Jeremy Glick’s open phone line after Glick goes to attack the hijackers. A reporter summarizes Makely explaining that, “The silence last[s] two minutes, then there [is] screaming. More silence, followed by more screams. Finally, there [is] a mechanical sound, followed by nothing.” (van Derbeken 9/17/2001) The second silence lasts between 60 and 90 seconds. (Longman 2002, pp. 219) Near the end of the cockpit voice recording, loud wind sounds can be heard. (Longman 2002, pp. 270-271; Hirschkorn and Mattingly 4/19/2002) “Sources claim the last thing heard on the cockpit voice recorder is the sound of wind—suggesting the plane had been holed.” (Wallace 9/12/2002) There was at least one passenger, Don Greene, who was a professional pilot. Another passenger, Andrew Garcia, was a former flight controller. (Breslau 9/22/2001; Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 10/28/2001; Harnden 7/31/2002)


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