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Context of 'Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010: England Eliminated in First Round of Voting for 2018 World Cup'

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The Football Association agrees England will play an international friendly match in Thailand in the summer of 2011 in an attempt to influence the vote of Worawi Makudi, a Thai member of FIFA’s executive committee that is to vote on the hosts of the 2018 World Cup. This game is one a series of matches designed by England to influence executive committee votes; such matches will also be played with Egypt as well as Trinidad and Tobago. [insideworldfootball, 4/23/2010] However, Makudi will vote for the Spain/Portugal bid (see Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010) and England will then cancel the game in Thailand (see December 3, 2010).

Entity Tags: Football Association, Worawi Makudi

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

The South American Football Confederation, Comnebol, decides that the three representatives of its members on FIFA’s executive committee will vote for the Spain/Portugal bid to host the 2018 World Cup. [Guardian, 11/24/2010] The three representatives are Julio Grondona (Argentina), Ricardo Teixeira (Brazil), and Nicolas Leoz (Paraguay). [BBC, 12/2/2010]

Entity Tags: Nicolas Leoz, Julio Grondona, Ricardo Terra Teixeira, Comnebol

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

England and South Korea agree to vote for each other as potential hosts of the World Cup finals in 2018 and 2022. The deal is concluded by the English and South Korean members of FIFA’s executive committee, Geoff Thompson and Mong Joon Chung, over a whisky with British Prime Minister David Cameron. Chung is to vote for England to host the finals in 2018, whereas Thompson is to vote for South Korea in 2022. Thompson will carry out his end of the bargain (see Around 2:30 p.m. December 2, 2010), although Chung will not (see (December 1, 2010) and Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010). [Guardian, 12/4/2010]

Entity Tags: David Cameron, Mong Joon Chung, Geoff Thompson

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin calls officials in the government of South Korea to get them to influence a forthcoming vote to be cast by South Korean FIFA executive committee member Mong Joon Chung. Putin wants Chung to vote for Russia’s bid to host the 2018 World Cup. The leverage Putin uses to get the officials to pressure Chung is that South Korea needs Russian support in dealings with North Korea. Chung, a hugely wealthy member of the Hyundai dynasty with close links to South Korea’s ruling party, is then asked to vote for Russia. He has a pact with England to vote for its bid (see Before December 1, 2010), but does as he is now asked and votes for Russia (see Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010). [Guardian, 12/4/2010]

Entity Tags: Vladimir Putin, Mong Joon Chung

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

FIFA president Sepp Blatter warns fellow members of the organization’s executive committee of the “evils of the media” shortly before they vote on who will host the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. The remarks will be interpreted by some as encouragement not to vote for the English campaign, as the English media outlets Panorama and the Sunday Times have recently exposed corruption at FIFA. England will actually be eliminated in the first round of voting (see Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010). Andy Anson, the chief executive of the failed English bid, will later say: “I think that was unhelpful—the last thing those guys hear before they go and tick the box is the evil of the media. That is not helpful and actually inaccurate. I was told by someone who was in the room that that’s the last thing they were told by Sepp Blatter. There was a final sum-up before they voted and I think it was at the beginning of that.” [Press Association (London), 12/3/2011] It is unclear who the “someone who was in the room” is. However, one of the voters in the room is Geoff Thompson, chairman of England’s bid. [BBC, 12/2/2010]

Entity Tags: Andy Anson, Joseph S. Blatter, Geoff Thompson, International Federation of Association Football

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

England are eliminated in the first round of voting for the 2018 World Cup, after receiving only two votes. The full results of the first round and the FIFA executive committee members who voted for the various potential hosts are:
bullet England: two votes. Geoff Thompson (England) and Issa Hayatou (Cameroon). [BBC, 12/2/2010]
bullet Holland/Belgium: four votes. Michel D’Hooghe (Belgium) and Michel Platini (France, see December 4, 2010). [BBC, 12/2/2010]
bullet Spain/Portugal: seven votes. Angel Maria Villar Llona (Spain), Julio Grondona (Argentina), Ricardo Teixeira (Brazil), Nicolas Leoz (Paraguay, see November 24, 2010), Mohamed bin Hammam (Qatar, see May 1, 2011), Worawi Makudi (Thailand), and Hany Abo Rida (Egypt). [Daily Telegraph, 11/25/2010]
bullet Russia: nine votes. Vitaly Mutko (Russia) and Chuck Blazer (USA, see December 10, 2010).
The other members of the executive committee who voted (two for Holland/Belgium, the rest for Russia) are Sepp Blatter (Switzerland), Mong Joon Chung (South Korea), Jack Warner (Trinidad and Tobago), Senes Erzik (Turkey), Junji Ogura (Japan), Marios Lefkaritis (Cyprus), Jacques Anouma (Ivory Coast), Franz Beckenbauer (Germany), and Rafael Salguero (Guatemala). [BBC, 12/2/2010] As there is no absolute majority in the first round, the vote will go to a second round. [BBC, 12/2/2010]

Entity Tags: Jack Warner, Worawi Makudi, Vitaly Mutko, Issa Hayatou, Hany Abo Rida, Geoff Thompson, Franz Beckenbauer, Senes Erzik, Angel Maria Villar Llona, Chuck Blazer, International Federation of Association Football, Ricardo Terra Teixeira, Nicolas Leoz, Rafael Salguero, Julio Grondona, Michel D’Hooghe, Marios Lefkaritis, Jacques Anouma, Joseph S. Blatter, Junji Ogura, Mong Joon Chung, Michel Platini, Mohamed bin Hammam

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

FIFA’s executive committee votes to award the 2018 World Cup finals to Russia, which receives an absolute majority in the second round of the ballot. England was eliminated in the first round (see Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010). The full results of the second round and the FIFA executive committee members who voted for the various potential hosts are:
bullet Holland/Belgium: two votes. Michel D’Hooghe (Belgium). [BBC, 12/2/2010]
bullet Spain/Portugal: seven votes. Angel Maria Villar Llona, Julio Grondona (Argentina), Ricardo Teixeira (Brazil), Nicolas Leoz (Paraguay, see November 24, 2010), Mohamed bin Hammam (Qatar, see May 1, 2011), Worawi Makudi (Thailand), and Hany Abo Rida (Egypt). [Daily Telegraph, 11/25/2010]
bullet Russia: 13 votes. Vitaly Mutko (Russia) and Chuck Blazer (USA, see December 10, 2010).
The other members of the executive committee who voted (one for Holland/Belgium, the rest for Russia) are Sepp Blatter (Switzerland), Michel Platini (France), Mong Joon Chung (South Korea), Jack Warner (Trinidad and Tobago), Senes Erzik (Turkey), Geoff Thompson (England), Issa Hayatou (Cameroon), Junji Ogura (Japan), Marios Lefkaritis (Cyprus), Jacques Anouma (Ivory Coast), Franz Beckenbauer (Germany), and Rafael Salguero (Guatemala). [BBC, 12/2/2010]

Entity Tags: International Federation of Association Football, Ricardo Terra Teixeira, Hany Abo Rida, Vitaly Mutko, Worawi Makudi, Franz Beckenbauer, Rafael Salguero, Angel Maria Villar Llona, Chuck Blazer, Nicolas Leoz, Senes Erzik, Mohamed bin Hammam, Jacques Anouma, Jack Warner, Issa Hayatou, Joseph S. Blatter, Geoff Thompson, Mong Joon Chung, Michel D’Hooghe, Marios Lefkaritis, Julio Grondona, Junji Ogura, Michel Platini

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

The Football Association decides to cancel a friendly match scheduled to be played by England in Thailand at the end of the season. The match was agreed earlier in the year in an attempt to induce Worawi Makudi, a Thai member of FIFA’s executive committee, to vote for England’s bid to host the 2018 World Cup (see Shortly Before April 23, 2010). However, Makudi voted for Spain (see Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010), and England now cancels the game in retaliation. [Daily Telegraph, 12/3/2010]

Entity Tags: Football Association, Worawi Makudi

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

British journalist Charles Sale says that UEFA president and FIFA executive committee member Michel Platini voted for Holland/Belgium in the first round of voting for the 2018 World Cup hosts (see Around 2:00 p.m. December 2, 2010). He adds that Platini voted for Russia in the second round. [Daily Mail, 12/4/2010] It is unclear how Sale could know this, as the vote is secret. However, the details of the vote indicate that two or three voters switched from Holland/Belgium in the first round to Russia in the second. [BBC, 12/2/2010]

Entity Tags: International Federation of Association Football, Charles Sale, Michel Platini

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

Chuck Blazer, the US representative on FIFA’s executive committee, says he voted for Russia to host the 2018 World Cup. “I voted for Russia,” Blazer says. “England clearly had a great bid. But in the end, I look at England and say, ‘What more would we have when we’re finished other than what I am certain would have been a great World Cup?’ I believe that when we’re finished in Russia, we’ll have accomplished a lot of different things. We can open up a market that is important from a world perspective.” [Daily Telegraph, 12/10/2010]

Entity Tags: Chuck Blazer, International Federation of Association Football

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

British newspaper The Observer states that Mohamed bin Hammam, a Qatari, president of the Asian Football Confederation, and a senior member of FIFA’s executive committee, voted for the Spain/Portugal bid for the 2018 World Cup in December 2010. Shortly before the vote, bin Hammam denied he had a deal with Spain/Portugal to vote for their bid for 2018 in return for them voting for Qatar in 2022 (see November 28, 2010). [Observer, 5/1/2011] It is unclear how The Observer knows this, as information about who voted for which bid is secret. [BBC, 12/2/2010]

Entity Tags: Mohamed bin Hammam, Asian Football Confederation

Timeline Tags: Football Business and Politics

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