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Context of 'June 21, 2001: Some Saskatoon Farmers Say Herbicide-Tolerant Crops Have Many Benefits'

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Mike Robinson, owner of a private investigation company that works for Monsanto, visits Percy Schmeiser at his farm. Schmeiser learns that Monsanto is investigating him and that an investigator working for Robinson took plant samples from his fields in 1997 (see August 18, 1997). Robinson says Monsanto suspects Schmeiser is illegally growing its patent-protected Roundup Ready Canola. Schmeiser accuses Robinson’s company of trespassing. (Lyons 6/14/2000; Federal Court of Canada 6/22/2000, pp. 21 pdf file; Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Percy Schmeiser 3/29/2001, pp. 21 pdf file)

Percy Schmeiser announces that he will appeal Federal Judge Andrew MacKay’s ruling (see March 29, 2001) that he infringed on Monsanto’s patent for Roundup Ready Canola . (Lyons 5/25/2001; Lyons 6/21/2001)

Don Carlson, president of the Humboldt and District Marketing Club, contends in an op-ed piece published by the Saskatoon Star Phoenix that herbicide-tolerant crops, such as Roundup Ready Canola, have resulted in numerous benefits for farmers. He says these benefits include “reduced tillage, earlier seeding, lower fuel and chemical costs, less erosion and less salinity.” He says he and others felt compelled to write the op-ed in response to all the negative information about GM crops, which they blame on Monsanto’s lawsuit against farmer Percy Schmeiser. (Star Phoenix (Saskatoon) 6/22/2001)

The Saskatoon Star Phoenix reports that Monsanto’s legal costs for suing Percy Schmeiser amount to $726,768.10 CAD. (Lyons 7/24/2001) Reportedly, of that amount, $30,000 CAD was paid to Dr. Keith Downey, one of the scientists who testified against Schmeiser. (Ho 9/2002) Schmeiser’s lawyer, Terry Zakreski, tells the newspaper that he believes Monsanto will attempt to seek about $220,000 CAD of that amount. (Lyons 7/24/2001)

Federal Court of Canada Justice Andrew MacKay orders Percy Schmeiser to pay Monsanto $153,000 CAD in order to compensate the company for a portion of its legal costs. Monsanto sued Schmeiser in 2000 (see June 5, 2000-June 21, 2000) for illegally planting and harvesting canola in 1998 that he “knew or ought to have known” contained Monsanto’s patent-protected Roundup-resistant gene. This sum of money is in addition to the $19,832 CAD that Schmeiser has already been ordered to pay the company (see May 23, 2001). (Lyons 4/29/2002)


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