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Context of 'June 26, 2002: Appeal Court Rules One Public Defender Cannot Meet Detainee'

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Judge Robert G. Doumar of the US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Norfolk, rules in favor of “enemy combatant” Yaser Esam Hamdi’s Federal Public Defender (FPD) and orders the government to grant the FPD access to Hamdi “because of fundamental justice provided under the Constitution.” Doumar orders that the meeting take place, unmonitored, on June 1, 2002. The government files a motion for stay pending appeal two days later, which is granted on June 4 by the Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. [Yaser Esam Hamdi, et al. v. Donald Rumsfeld, et al., 6/24/2002; Washington Post, 1/9/2003]

Entity Tags: Yaser Esam Hamdi, Robert G. Doumar

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

Jose Padilla.
Jose Padilla. [Source: Florida Department of Motor Vehicles]Attorney General John Ashcroft announces the arrest of Abdullah al-Mujahir, a.k.a. Jose Padilla. He claims that Padilla was part of an al-Qaeda plot to detonate a radioactive “dirty bomb” in a US city, and supposedly Padilla was scouting bomb targets when arrested. Padilla, a US citizen, is being held as an “enemy combatant,” allowing him to be held indefinitely. [Guardian, 6/11/2002; PBS, 6/11/2002] But almost immediately, doubts grow about this story. The London Times says that it is “beyond dispute” that the timing of the announcement of his arrest was “politically inspired.” Padilla was actually arrested a month earlier, on May 8. [London Times, 6/13/2002] It is widely believed that Ashcroft made the arrest announcement “only to divert attention from Intelligence Committee inquiries into the FBI and CIA handling of 9/11.” [Village Voice, 6/12/2002; Independent, 6/12/2002; BBC, 6/13/2002; Washington Post, 6/13/2003] Four days earlier, Coleen Rowley testified before Congress. The FBI whistleblower stated her belief that the attacks of Sept. 11 could have been prevented had the FBI flight-school warnings been made available to the agents investigating Zacharias Moussaoui. [Rolling Stone, 9/21/2006 pdf file] Bush soon privately chastises Ashcroft for overstating claims about Padilla. [Guardian, 8/15/2002] The government attorneys apparently could not get an indictment out of a New York grand jury and, rather than let him go, made Padilla an enemy combatant. [Village Voice, 6/12/2002] It later comes out that the FBI found no evidence that he was preparing a dirty bomb attack and little evidence to suggest he had any support from al-Qaeda, or any ties to al-Qaeda cells in the US. Yet the Justice Department maintains that its view of Padilla “remains unchanged,” and that he is a “serious and continuing threat.” [Guardian, 8/15/2002] Because Padilla is a US citizen, he cannot be tried in a military court. So apparently he will simply be held indefinitely. It is pointed out that any American could be declared an enemy combatant and never tried or have that status questioned. [San Francisco Chronicle, 6/11/2002; Washington Post, 6/11/2002] The Washington Post says, “If that’s the case, nobody’s constitutional rights are safe.” [Washington Post, 6/11/2002] Despite the evidence that Padilla’s case is grossly overstated, the government won’t allow him access to a lawyer (see December 4, 2002; March 11, 2003).

Entity Tags: Al-Qaeda, Central Intelligence Agency, London Times, Joint Intelligence Committee, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Jose Padilla

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline

Donna R. Newman, attorney for “enemy combatant” Jose Padilla (see June 10, 2002), files a habeas corpus petition in the District Court for the Southern District of New York. Newman informs the court that she has been told by the government that she is not permitted to visit Padilla or to speak with him. She may write, but he might not receive the correspondence, she says. [Jose Padilla v. George W. Bush et al., 12/4/2002 pdf file]

Entity Tags: Jose Padilla, Donna R. Newman

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives, Civil Liberties

The Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reverses a court ruling issued on May 29 (see May 29, 2002) by Judge Robert G. Doumar of the US District Court in Norfolk. The appeal court says that US Federal Public Defender Frank W. Dunham is not related to “enemy combatant” Yaser Esam Hamdi and has never met him, and thus cannot file a petition on his behalf. This does not affect the habeas case of Yaser Esam Hamdi, Hamdi’s father, or an order issued on June 11 (see June 11, 2002) by a district court judge to allow a Federal Public Defender access to the detainee. [Yaser Esam Hamdi, et al. v. Donald Rumsfeld, et al., 6/24/2002]

Entity Tags: Yaser Esam Hamdi

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

The Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decides in favor of the government, refusing to uphold a district court’s order (see May 29, 2002) that “enemy combatant” Yaser Esam Hamdi be allowed access to his lawyer. The appeals court argues that the district court ordered access “without adequately considering [its] implications.” It states that it “has long been established that if Hamdi is indeed an ‘enemy combatant’ who was captured during hostilities in Afghanistan, the government’s present detention of him is a lawful one.” In deference to the government, the court states that the “executive is best prepared to exercise the military judgment attending the capture of alleged combatants,” adding that the “political branches are best positioned to comprehend this global war in its full context and it is the president who has been charged to use force against those ‘nations, organizations, or persons he determines’ were responsible for the September 11 terrorist attacks.” The court asserts that the “Constitution’s commitment of the conduct of war to the political branches of American government requires the court’s respect at every step.” [Yaser Esam Hamdi, et al. v. Donald Rumsfeld, et al., 6/24/2002] The unanimous three-judge ruling is written by Judge Harvey Wilkinson IV, appointed to the bench by President Reagan in 1984 and often touted as a potential Supreme Court nominee by Bush administration officials and supporters. [Savage, 2007, pp. 153]

Entity Tags: Harvey Wilkinson IV, Yaser Esam Hamdi

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

In the case of Jose Padilla v. Donald Rumsfeld (see June 9, 2002), the Supreme Court votes 5-4 in favor of the government, declining to rule on the basis of a technicality. The majority argues that Padilla’s petition was incorrectly filed in New York rather than in South Carolina, where he is currently held. While Padilla was held in New York in preparation for an appearance before a grand jury, Defense Secretary Rumsfeld designated him an enemy combatant. Padilla was thereupon transferred to military custody and sent to a naval brig in South Carolina to be detained indefinitely. His lawyer meanwhile, unaware of her client’s transfer, filed a habeas corpus petition in New York against Rumsfeld (see June 11, 2002). This was erroneous, says the majority, which rules that Padilla has to re-file his petition in South Carolina. Four dissenting judges condemn the “secret transfer” of Padilla. Justice John Paul Stevens, writing for the minority, declares, “At stake in this case is nothing less than the essence of a free society.” Stevens also condemns the use of “incommunicado detention for months on end” as a means “to extract information” and places it among the “tools of tyrants.” [Supreme Court opinion on writ of certiorari. Shafiq Rasul, et al. v. George W. Bush, et al., 6/28/2004] Therefore, in essence, the majority declines to rule on the merits of the case. [Savage, 2007, pp. 193]

Entity Tags: Jose Padilla, John Paul Stevens, Donald Rumsfeld

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives, Civil Liberties

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