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Context of 'November 21-23, 2003: 20 Detainees from Guantanamo Are Repatriated, 20 New Detainees Arrive'

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Gen. Michael Dunlavey, head of the intelligence operations at Guantanamo, faces an outbreak of unrest among the prisoners after he announces that four detainees will be repatriated: three Afghans and a Tajik. According to an October 20 email sent by an FBI official from Guantanamo, these detainees “will be taken back to their respective countries in late October and the same plane will return with between ten and thirty-four new detainees.” After the announcement, the camp erupts in unrest and there is a “threat of mass suicide by the detainees.” [Federal Bureau of Investigation, 10/26/2002 pdf file] It is not clear what has caused the unrest. According to Shafiq Rasul, one of the detainees, “They would announce upon loud speakers (particularly when people were released) that if we co-operated with them they would release us. We knew this included acting as an informant.” [Rasul, Iqbal, and Ahmed, 7/26/2004 pdf file] According to the FBI official, “no suicides [happen] and the Camp quickly [settles] down.” [Federal Bureau of Investigation, 10/26/2002 pdf file]

Entity Tags: Shafiq Rasul, Michael E. Dunlavey

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

One Guantanamo detainee is released and four Saudi detainees are transferred “for continued detention by the government of Saudi Arabia.” The Defense Department releases no further details. [US Department of Defense, 5/16/2003]

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

The Defense Department announces that 27 detainees from Guantanamo have been repatriated to their countries of origin. Ten new detainees arrive at Guantanamo, bringing the total number, according to the Defense Department, “to approximately 660.” [US Department of Defense, 7/18/2003]

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

Twenty detainees are transferred from Guantanamo to their home countries. Whether they are to be released upon arrival or to remain in detention in these countries is not revealed. [US Department of Defense, 11/24/2003] Two days later, about 20 new detainees arrive. The total number of detainees at Guantanamo now stands at approximately 660. Little information about the identities and home countries of the detainees is released to the public. [US Department of Defense, 11/24/2003]

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

The Defense Department reports that are about 590 detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. [US Department of Defense, 7/27/2004] This is a decrease from its maximum number of about 660 detainees in about November 2003 (see November 21-23, 2003).

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

Pentagon officials announce that the number of detainees at the Guantanamo prison has been reduced to about 355. Eighty of these have been cleared for release or transfer. Fourteen are deemed “high value” detainees. The US has been working to reduce the population at Guantanamo as it considers closing the prison. [Washington Post, 8/10/2007]

Timeline Tags: Torture of US Captives

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