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Context of 'October 2004: Campaign Workers Receiving Money from Republican Party Call People Recently Released from Jail in Ohio County'

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In Franklin County, Ohio, a Holiday Inn employee reportedly observes 25 people from the “Texas Strike Force” using payphones to call likely voters, targeting people recently in the prison system. According to the hotel worker’s account, one of the callers threatens someone with being reported to the FBI and returning to jail if he shows up at the polls to vote. When another hotel worker calls the police to report the crime, the police come to the hotel, but do nothing. [Free Press, 12/13/2004] Though the members of the “Texas Strike Force” paid their way to Ohio, their hotel bill is reportedly paid by the Ohio Republican Party, whose headquarters is located across the street. [Human Events, 12/1/2004; Free Press, 12/13/2004]

Timeline Tags: 2004 Elections

The Republican Party provides Ohio election officials with lists of the people they have recruited to work as “challengers” on election day. According to a 1953 Ohio state law—which critics says is rooted in a blatantly racist 1886 statute that emerged after the Civil War—“challengers” are permitted to challenge the qualifications of voters who they suspect are not eligible to vote. [New York Times, 10/23/2004; Cincinnati Enquirer, 11/1/2004] Before a challenger can ask a poll worker to question a voter, it must first be shown that there is “reasonable” justification for doubting a voter’s qualifications. All eligible voters must be citizens, at least 18, a resident of the county and must have lived in Ohio for the previous 30 days. The Republicans’ list includes 3,600 challengers, many of whom will be working in the heavily Democratic urban neighborhoods of Cleveland, Dayton and other cities. For example 1,436 of the Republican challengers will be stationed in Cuyahoga County, which includes Cleveland, a Democratic stronghold. The Republicans claim that using challengers is necessary because the Democrats may have fraudulently registered thousands of ineligible voters. The Democrats enlist more than 2,000 recruits as challengers who they hope will protect legitimate voters from being denied their rights by their Republican counterparts. But in some of the most critical counties the Democrats will be grossly outnumbered. For Cuyahoga County, the Democrats will only have 300 challengers. [New York Times, 10/23/2004] Election officials are concerned about the huge number of challenges that are expected at the polls. “I’m not sure how we’re going to accomplish this,” says John Williams, deputy elections director in Hamilton County. “We’ve never had anything like this before.” Some fear that the challengers intend to reduce voter turnout. “Some observers worry the parties will indiscriminately challenge voters in heavily Democratic or Republican precincts as a strategy to discourage people from voting,” The Columbus Dispatch reports. [Columbus Dispatch, 10/23/2004]

Timeline Tags: Civil Liberties, 2004 Elections

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