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Profile: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Atlanta Journal-Constitution was a participant or observer in the following events:

Bradley Schlozman, the head of the voting rights section of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division (CRD), writes an op-ed published in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution alleging that the newspaper is guilty of “confus[ing] and misrepresent[ing]” the facts surrounding his office’s approval of a controversial Georgia voter identification statute (see 2005). The voter ID law has been criticized as being discriminatory against minorities and being designed to suppress minority voting. Schlozman says that the newspaper’s publication of a leaked internal memorandum from his office was unfair, as it “was merely a draft that did not incorporate the analytical work and extensive research conducted by all the attorneys assigned to the matter.” He goes on to accuse the paper of failing to report that the memo “did not represent the recommendation of the veteran career chief of the Civil Rights Division’s voting section, to whom preclearance approval decisions are expressly delegated by federal regulation.” Schlozman says that the voter ID law is “clearly not racially retrogressive within the limited scope of the Voting Rights Act,” and denies that demanding a number of identification papers from minority voters has ever been shown to have “any adverse impact on minority voters.” Data in the leaked memo showed that a significant proportion of African-American voters would be prevented from voting by the voter ID law; Schlozman writes that “corrected data… not incorporated in the leaked memo… indicate that African-American citizens are actually slightly more likely than white citizens to possess one of the necessary forms of identification.” He concludes: “Attorneys of the voting section have worked diligently to enforce voting laws and have achieved concrete, measurable advances for a record number of minority voters. We are enormously proud of this accomplishment.” [Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 11/25/2005] The Georgia voter identification law will be overturned by a federal court as illegal and discriminatory (see September 19, 2006).

Entity Tags: Civil Rights Division (DOJ), Bradley J. Schlozman, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Timeline Tags: Civil Liberties

A virulent anti-gay post on a gay rights blog comes from the office of Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), according to that office. Hours after Senate Republicans blocked a vote on repealing the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” (DADT) policy regarding gays in the service, a poster only identifying himself as “Jimmy” visits the gay rights blog Joe.My.God and posts, “All f_ggots must die.” Blog owner Joe Jervis, a gay rights activist, checks the IP (Internet protocol) address of the commenter and finds that it comes from a US Senate address in Atlanta, Georgia. The office of Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA) tells the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that the comment did not come from his office. Chambliss’s office responds with the following statement: “We have seen the allegations and are moving quickly to understand the facts. This office has not and will not tolerate any activity of the sort alleged. Once we have ascertained whether these claims are true, we will take the appropriate steps.” [Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 9/21/2010; Joe Jervis, 9/21/2010; TPM Muckraker, 9/22/2010] The day after the post is made, Chambliss issues a statement admitting that the post came from his office, though his staff has not yet determined who made it. Chambliss’s office makes the admission to a Journal-Constitution reporter, and says it has turned the matter over to the Senate’s sergeant at arms. [Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 9/22/2010; TPM Muckraker, 9/22/2010] Days later, Chambliss will fire the staffer, though he will continue to withhold the staffer’s identity. “The office of the Senate sergeant at arms has concluded its investigation, and I responded to that report immediately with the removal of a member of my staff,” Chambliss says in a statement. “I have called Mr. Jervis, the blog’s author, and apologized to him personally, and I am sorry for the hurt this incident has caused. Regardless of one’s position on issues and policies, such comments are simply unacceptable, are not befitting those who work in the US Senate, and I will not tolerate them from my staff.” [TPM Muckraker, 9/30/2010]

Entity Tags: Saxby Chambliss, Joe Jervis, Johnny Isakson, Office of the Senate Sergeant at Arms, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Timeline Tags: Domestic Propaganda

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