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Profile: Debra Bonamici

Debra Bonamici was a participant or observer in the following events:

Judge Reggie Walton refuses to allow the defense in the Lewis Libby trial to have NBC reporter Andrea Mitchell testify. In October 2003, Mitchell told MSNBC talk show host Don Imus that she and other reporters knew Valerie Plame Wilson was a CIA official, but she later retracted the statement (see October 3, 2003). Walton does not agree with defense lawyer Theodore Wells’s contention that Mitchell’s statement, even though later retracted, somehow impeaches the credibility of her NBC colleague Tim Russert, who testified last week that he did not tell Libby of Plame Wilson’s CIA status (see February 7-8, 2007). Debra Bonamici, a lawyer for the prosecution, tells the court: “The question to be asked is what purpose would be served by impeaching their witness? Defense intends to ask about an unrelated subject—what Libby said to Mitchell, we presume that defense would want her to be credible. This is a ruse to present the non-admissible testimony [referring to the defense’s previous attempts to play the videotape of Mitchell’s conversation with Imus—see February 8, 2007]. They’ve got no reason to impeach, they’re setting up a straw man so they can impeach.” Walton rules that the defense is asking the jury to speculate that reporters such as Mitchell and Russert knew Plame Wilson’s identity, then speculate that Libby learned about Plame Wilson from Russert, and thusly infer that Libby was telling the truth to investigators. “I think there’s a lot of mischief that comes with that,” Walton says. [Marcy Wheeler, 2/12/2007]

Entity Tags: Tim Russert, Andrea Mitchell, Debra Bonamici, Reggie B. Walton, Don Imus, Valerie Plame Wilson, Lewis (“Scooter”) Libby, Theodore Wells

Timeline Tags: Niger Uranium and Plame Outing

Judge Reggie Walton rules that if Lewis Libby does not testify on his own behalf during his perjury and obstruction trial, the defense will be prohibited from presenting some of its evidence and arguments about his poor memory accounting for his lies and misstatements (see January 31, 2006 and January 24, 2007). The defense protests, leading some court observers to speculate that Libby may indeed not testify, though defense lawyers say no decision has yet been made as to his potential testimony. [Marcy Wheeler, 2/12/2007; New York Sun, 2/13/2007; Washington Post, 2/13/2007; New York Times, 2/13/2007] Walton tells the defense that he feels he was misled, having been told all along that Libby would testify. “I didn’t think that was the landscape in which we were operating,” Walton says. The Washington Post calls Walton “irritated,” and the New York Times characterizes him as “annoyed.” [Marcy Wheeler, 2/12/2007; Washington Post, 2/13/2007; New York Times, 2/13/2007] Assistant prosecutor Debra Bonamici tells Walton that all of their filings regarding what classified information could be presented in open court were based on the assumption that Libby would testify: “The truth is we did assume that Libby was going to testify, and we did so because [the defense] asked us to assume that. Everything we did was based on the asumption and it would be fundamentally unfair to hold us to an agreement we made based on those assumptions.” [Marcy Wheeler, 2/12/2007] Walton says that unless Libby testifies, he does not plan to allow the defense to argue in its closing that the Valerie Plame Wilson issue was less important to Libby than other matters. Only Libby can testify to how important those issues were to him, Walton says. But, the Times writes, Libby’s lawyers do not want to expose him to cross-examination by prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald. John Cline, one of Libby’s lawyers, says he hopes to introduce evidence of Libby’s busy schedule through testimony of his former top aide, John Hannah (see February 13, 2007). [Marcy Wheeler, 2/12/2007; Marcy Wheeler, 2/12/2007; New York Times, 2/13/2007] Former federal prosecutor Joshua Berman, who has worked with both Fitzgerald and lead defense lawyer Theodore Wells, says Wells often waits until the last minute to decide which witnesses to call. “I’ve heard him say, ‘I often make the decision [to call a key witness] that morning,” Berman says, and adds that Wells has been “thinking about it every single morning and night since the trial began.” [USA Today, 2/12/2007]

Entity Tags: Joshua Berman, John Cline, Theodore Wells, Debra Bonamici, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, Lewis (“Scooter”) Libby, Reggie B. Walton, John Hannah

Timeline Tags: Niger Uranium and Plame Outing

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