The Center for Grassroots Oversight

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Profile: Michael Wilkes

Michael Wilkes was a participant or observer in the following events:

The Congressional Committee on Government Reform ends a 15-month investigation aimed at assessing how the FDA is fulfilling its regulatory responsibilities. The committee’s report, based on thousands of pages of internal agency enforcement records, concludes that enforcement activity has dropped dramatically under the Bush administration. According to the review, the annual number of FDA warning letters fell 54 percent between 2000 and 2005, from 1,154 to 535, a 15-year low. Additionally, the number of seizures of mislabeled, defective, and dangerous products dropped by 44 percent. According to the investigation, there were at least 138 cases where the FDA ignored recommendations from agency field inspectors to take enforcement actions. (US Congress 6/26/2006 pdf file; Harris 6/27/2006) In letters written to the committee, experts voiced concern that the FDA is becoming less vigilant in its oversight duties. Dr. Jerry Avorn of the Harvard Medical School, wrote that there is “a growing laxity in FDA’s surveillance and enforcement procedures,” a “dangerous decline in regulatory vigilance,” and an “obvious unwillingness to move forward even on claims from its own field offices.” Avorn describes the FDA as “an agency unwilling to exert its regulatory authority in defense of the public’s health.” (Avorn 6/26/2006 pdf file) Dr. Michael Wilkes of the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, says the FDA has “systematically ignored District Field Officers and regularly overridden their explicit and well documented concerns about drug safety and public health.” It “seems unable and unwilling to step in to protect the American public,” he adds. (Wilkes 6/10/2006 pdf file) Another problem identified during the committee’s review of the documents concerns the agency’s record keeping. In response to questions from the committee, officials said the FDA lacks a centralized case tracking system and does not maintain a record of the enforcement recommendations made by its district offices. As a result, the investigation had to rely on the personal recollection of field office employees. (US Congress 6/26/2006 pdf file)


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