The Center for Grassroots Oversight

This page can be viewed at http://www.historycommons.org/entity.jsp?entity=sevilla_f_tbol_club_s_a_d__1


Profile: Sevilla Fútbol Club S.A.D.

Sevilla Fútbol Club S.A.D. was a participant or observer in the following events:

Some Spanish football clubs fail to back a proposed agreement on how to share income from collectively-sold domestic television rights from the 2015-16 season. Under the agreement, the largest two Spanish clubs, Read Madrid and Barcelona, would share 34 percent of all income, Atletico Madrid and Valencia would share 11 percent, the remaining 16 top-tier Spanish clubs would split 45 percent equally, and there would be parachute payments for relegated clubs. The proposal is opposed by Sevilla, Zaragoza, Villarreal, Real Sociedad, Athletic Bilbao, and Espanyol, with Malaga undecided. “Only Real Madrid and Barcelona stand to gain from this,” says Sevilla president Jose Maria del Nido, spokesman for the rebels. “The two giants have earned €1,500 million more than the next club in the last 10 years, and with this agreement in place four clubs—Real Madrid, Barcelona, Atletico Madrid, and Valencia—will all earn more in the next six years than a team that finishes third in the league.” The rebels propose a different agreement under which revenue would be shared more equally. “Of the 79 leagues played 51 have been won by Real Madrid or Barcelona, which is 65 percent against 35 percent for the rest,” adds del Nido. “In the last 10 years the two big clubs have won 80 percent of the titles with 20 percent for the rest. And most significantly, in the last five years only these two have won the title. If this continues the league title will have been sold in advance for the next 10 years.” (Redshaw 11/18/2010)

Spanish football clubs conclude a new TV revenue-sharing agreement, which has been under negotiation for some time (see (November 17, 2010)). Under the deal, Real Madrid and Barcelona will share 35 percent of TV revenues; the second and third most popular clubs, Atletico Madrid and Valencia, will share 11 percent; and the remaining 16 clubs will get 45 percent between them. In addition, for the first time the Spanish league will offer a “parachute payment” to protect teams that are relegated to a lower tier: the sudden drop into the second division—and large fall in TV income—had previously been difficult for clubs to handle as they still had to pay high wages despite playing in a lesser competition. The unequal distribution draws some protest. For example, Sevilla sporting director Ramon Rodriguez Verdejo comments that the Spanish league “reminds me more and more of Scotland,” which has been dominated by two clubs for decades. Sports Illustrated and Guardian columnist Sid Lowe adds that the “inequality” between Barcelona and Read Madrid on the one hand and the other 18 clubs on the other is now “enshrined,” commenting that the other 18 teams in Spain “no longer aspire… to be the best; but they [do] aspire to stay in business.” (Lowe 1/14/2011)


Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike