!! History Commons Alert, Exciting News

Profile: Victor Calanog

Victor Calanog was a participant or observer in the following events:

The second quarter of any year is generally considered peak leasing season in the US, but reports show that during the second quarter of 2009, the apartment vacancy rate rose to a 22-year high because of rising unemployment that decreased apartment rental demand. Rents plunged fastest in markets such as New York and San Jose, California, where many white collar jobs have been lost. Additionally, markets such as Las Vegas and Orange County, California, that have transformed foreclosed homes and condominiums into rental property also suffered a decrease in vacancies. Nationally, vacancy levels rose from 6.1 percent in 2008 to 7.5 percent in the April to June 2009 period. Victor Calanog, Reis’s director of research, says: “Everyone expected spring leasing to save apartment landlords. That hasn’t happened.” Initially, the housing catastrophe offered property owners a chance to entice distressed homeowners into the leasing market, but job losses occurred at such a rapid pace that any increases that apartment leasing might have garnered from the housing crisis were destroyed. The rise in apartment vacancies began at the end of 2007, further quickening with the worsening of the economy in fall 2008. Meantime, rents have continued to fall at the swiftest pace in more than a decade and effective rents—concessions by landlords such as a month’s free rent—fell 1.1 percent in first quarter 2009 and 0.9 percent in the second quarter, and averaged $975 per month. At 5.8 percent, New York City marked the largest 12-month rent decrease with an average of $2,680 per month. Statistics are based on a survey by Reis Inc., a New York real estate research firm, which tracked 79 markets, of which 45 showed vacancy increases. [Wall Street Journal, 7/8/2009]

Entity Tags: Victor Calanog, Reis Inc.

Timeline Tags: Global Economic Crises

Ordering 

Time period


Email Updates

Receive weekly email updates summarizing what contributors have added to the History Commons database

 
Donate

Developing and maintaining this site is very labor intensive. If you find it useful, please give us a hand and donate what you can.
Donate Now

Volunteer

If you would like to help us with this effort, please contact us. We need help with programming (Java, JDO, mysql, and xml), design, networking, and publicity. If you want to contribute information to this site, click the register link at the top of the page, and start contributing.
Contact Us

Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike