!! History Commons Alert, Exciting News

Profile: Walter (“Mac”) McCarty

Related Entities:

Walter (“Mac”) McCarty was a participant or observer in the following events:

Future Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh (see November 1991 - Summer 1992 and 8:35 a.m. - 9:02 a.m. April 19, 1995), who has moved to Kingman, Arizona, and stays sometimes with friends and sometimes in a rented trailer (see February - July 1994), tries and fails to hold down several menial jobs. Former supervisors and co-workers will later recall McVeigh having problems staying employed, with what the New York Times will call “a spotty work record at several jobs here, marked mostly by silence toward his co-workers and sudden terminations.” (The Times account is questionable, as it will also make questionable allegations about McVeigh’s behavior at his residence—see February - July 1994.) Fellow security guard Fred Burkett will recall being impressed with McVeigh’s skill with weapons. “Believe me, the one thing he did not need was firearms training,” Burkett will tell a reporter. “He was very good and we were impressed with his action. He was arrogant about it. He had this kind of look of ‘You think you’re good, watch this.’ And I have to admit he was real good. We were impressed with him as far as his handling of a weapon because usually we take someone out for training and it’s like the first time they have ever held a gun. But he was very familiar with the gun.” Other than this, Burkett will recall, McVeigh is “pretty much normal.… He had a very dry personality. He was not very outgoing, not talkative and not really that friendly. He wasn’t a person that mingled. He was a kind of by-yourself kind of person, a loner. The only thing he ever indicated was that he didn’t care much for the United States government and how they ran things. He didn’t care much for authority and especially when it concerned the government.” Burkett will also remember McVeigh’s fondness for military garb along with his distate for authority. “He always wore military garb, like jungle clothes, like if you were in Vietnam,” Burkett will recall. “He always wore his hair short, just like when they caught him. I didn’t think it was that big of a deal at the time. I mean, I thought maybe he was still in the Army or something.… McVeigh liked the stringency of the Army. He liked the uniformity of everybody dressing the same and walking the same. But he did not like taking orders from people who he did not think were his superiors. He did not like the US Army.” McVeigh loses his security guard position after shouting at a supervisor who reprimands him for watching television while on duty. McVeigh also works for a few months at the aforementioned hardware store; manager Mike Boggio will remember him as a “quiet” man who “wore his fatigues every day” and politically was “pretty anti-everything.” Hardware store owner Paul Shuffler will recall that McVeigh is not a political radical: “If he was a radical around here, I would have noticed it pretty quick and I would have fired him. Radicals don’t last long around here because they just make a mess of things.” McVeigh’s friend Walter “Mac” McCarty, a Korean War veteran who regularly conducts anti-gun control protests at the county courthouse, later says of McVeigh: “In public, he was quiet and polite and he had this big, easy smile. But when he talked about the country and politics and things, he got real mean and savage. He was one highly strung young man. I don’t think I ever saw anybody with such hatred in him. He was bitter about just about everything, and he believed the country was being taken over by big business and organized crime, and they were all tied up with the government. In particular, he hated the BATF boys [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms] and the Feds [FBI]. He used to rant on about how they had become just a big cowboy army, who were taking the law into their own hands. I tell you, he was running right on the edge.” [New York Times, 4/24/1995; Stickney, 1996, pp. 164]

Entity Tags: Mike Boggio, Fred Burkett, US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Walter (“Mac”) McCarty, Federal Bureau of Investigation, New York Times, Timothy James McVeigh, Paul Shuffler

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

New York Times reporter James Sterngold goes to Kingman, Arizona, to interview people there about a former resident, convicted Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh (see June 2, 1997), who now awaits execution (see June 11-13, 1997). While many in the small desert town continue to voice their suspicion of, and opposition to, the federal government as McVeigh did, they do not endorse McVeigh’s actions. McVeigh’s friend Walter “Mac” McCarty, an elderly ex-Marine who always carries a gun on his hip, recalls McVeigh attending some of his courses on handgun usage and safety (see February - July 1994). McCarty says he is angry at McVeigh for blowing up the Murrah Federal Building and killing 168 people (see 8:35 a.m. - 9:02 a.m. April 19, 1995). He calls the bombing senseless, but has an equal amount of anger and criticism for the FBI’s actions after the bombing, when he says agents from that bureau descended on the town and harassed its citizens. Kingman is not a haven for anti-government extremists, McCarty says. “There never was at any time a really organized militia or group like that around Kingman, and I would know,” he says. There are some people around here who think that way, I can tell you that. But it’s not organized like they say.” McCarty’s statement does not completely coincide with Kingman history. Arizona has had a number of active militias in the recent past, according to Kingman Police Chief Larry J. Butler, and some terrorist attacks, the largest being the derailment of an Amtrak train six months after McVeigh detonated his bomb (see October 9, 1995). Butler says during the mid-1990s, he would occasionally hear of hunters coming across makeshift survivalist camps in the desert. Butler remembers some “zealots” who would argue with his officers, claiming the government had no right to force them to register their cars or get drivers’ licenses, but he says those confrontations had dwindled away to almost nothing. Butler says: “To the extent there were any, Tim McVeigh killed the feelings for militias around here. I can tell you, there’s no sympathy for them.” Steve Johnson of the Mohave County Sheriff’s Department, agrees, saying: “I can’t say that they are here and I can’t say that they aren’t here. We just don’t see them.” Groups like the Southern Poverty Law Center say that since McVeigh’s bombing, the number of militia groups in Arizona has dropped sharply. [New York Times, 5/10/2001]

Entity Tags: Southern Poverty Law Center, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Larry J. Butler, Steve Johnson, James Sterngold, Timothy James McVeigh, Walter (“Mac”) McCarty

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

Ordering 

Time period


Email Updates

Receive weekly email updates summarizing what contributors have added to the History Commons database

 
Donate

Developing and maintaining this site is very labor intensive. If you find it useful, please give us a hand and donate what you can.
Donate Now

Volunteer

If you would like to help us with this effort, please contact us. We need help with programming (Java, JDO, mysql, and xml), design, networking, and publicity. If you want to contribute information to this site, click the register link at the top of the page, and start contributing.
Contact Us

Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike