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Profile: Wayne Sapp

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Wayne Sapp was a participant or observer in the following events:

A photo of Terry Jones standing in front of a sign announcing ‘International Burn a Koran Day,’ originally planned for September 11, 2010.A photo of Terry Jones standing in front of a sign announcing ‘International Burn a Koran Day,’ originally planned for September 11, 2010. [Source: London Daily Mail]Terry Jones, the pastor of a small church in Gainesville, Florida, called the Dove World Outreach Center, calls off his announced plan to burn copies of the Koran, apparently in response to worldwide condemnation and pleas to abandon the idea (see July 12, 2010 and After and September 6-9, 2010). Among many voices raised against Jones is a stern adjuration from President Obama that to burn a Koran, as Jones had announced he would, amounted to placing American troops in danger and serving as a recruitment tool for al-Qaeda (see September 10, 2010). Jones and his associate pastor, Wayne Sapp, announce the decision on September 9, and on the morning of September 10, appear on NBC’s morning talk show The Today Show to discuss the situation. They are interviewed in the studio by Carl Quintanilla. Jones says he and Sapp have come to New York to try to talk with a local imam, Feisal Abdul Rauf, about announced plans to build the Cordoba Center, a Muslim community center and mosque, a few blocks from the former World Trade Center. (The Center will later be renamed Park51.) Jones says he has already received assurances from Imam Muhammad Musri, the president of the Islamic Society of Central Florida, that the Cordoba Center will be relocated. However, Musri tells the reporter that no such relocation deal has been struck, but he and Jones intend to meet with Rauf to discuss the proposed relocation. Rauf says he knows of no plans to meet with Musri and Jones, and has no intention of relocating the center. Jones tells Quintanilla: “We feel that we have somewhat of a common denominator in the fact that most people do not want the mosque near Ground Zero. And, of course, I assume all Muslims do not want us to burn the Koran.” Jones says the Koran-burning, scheduled for 6 p.m., has been called off. He says: “[W]e feel that whenever we started this out, one of our reasons was to show, to expose that there is an element of Islam that is very dangerous and very radical. I believe that we have definitely accomplished that mission. Even though we have not burned one Koran, we have gotten over 100 death threats, we see what is going around in the whole world even if we do it. We feel a little bit—if you’re familiar with the story of Abraham, we feel a little bit like—Abraham was also called to do something very crazy. I mean, God told him to go to the mountain and sacrifice his son. Of course, Abraham was much wiser than us. He told no one. Yeah. So he got to the mountain. He started to do it, and God told him to stop. So we feel—we feel we have accomplished our goal. We were obedient. We feel that God is telling us to stop. And we also hope that with us making this first gesture, not burning the Koran… to say, ‘No, we’re not going to do it.‘… Not today, not ever. We’re not going to go back and do it. It is totally canceled. We hope that through that maybe that will open up a door to be able to talk to the iman about—yeah, about the Ground Zero mosque.” Quintanilla presses Jones, asking, “[Y]ou can guarantee us today that there will never be a burning of the Koran at your church?” Jones replies, “I can absolutely guarantee you that, yes.” Sapp explains that he and Jones do not believe that the entire religion of Islam is extremist, as media reports have quoted them as saying: “I believe there are some teachings that are carried on throughout the entire religion. They are as—as there are in denominations in Christianity—there are facets in Islam as well that push one element more than others. But that element is still alive and well throughout the entire religion.” Jones denies that his announced Koran-burning was to garner publicity for himself and his church, calling the planned burning “a mission” and attacking Islam’s “radical” elements. He also denies that the death threats he says he and his church members have received had anything to do with their decision not to go through with the Koran-burning. A “Burn a Koran Day” banner outside the Dove World Outreach Center has been taken down. [Associated Press, 9/9/2010; MSNBC, 9/11/2010] Later in the day, Jones adds that his decision was swayed by a telephone call he received from Defense Secretary Robert Gates (see September 9, 2010), what he terms a promise by Rauf to meet with him, and what he calls a firm promise by Musri that the Cordoba Center will be relocated. He will later accuse Rauf of lying and by the evening, indicates that plans to burn the Koran may be again in the offing (see September 10, 2010). Jones will indeed renege on his promise to not burn a Koran “not today, not ever,” burning a Koran in a public ceremony in March 2011 (see March 20, 2011). The Koran-burning will trigger a protest in Afghanistan that kills 11 people, including seven UN staffers and guards (see April 1, 2011).

Entity Tags: Muhammad Musri, Barack Obama, Al-Qaeda, Carl Quintanilla, Feisal Abdul Rauf, Park51, Terry Jones (pastor), Dove World Outreach Center, Wayne Sapp, Robert M. Gates

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

Florida pastor Terry Jones, who earlier in the day announced that he would “never” burn a Koran as he has previously threatened (see September 9-10, 2010), issues a new set of demands from his Gainesville church, the Dove World Outreach Center. He has announced his intention to meet with New York imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, in an attempt to dissuade Rauf and his colleagues from building the Cordoba Center, a Muslim community center and mosque, a few blocks away from “Ground Zero,” the site of the fallen World Trade Center. (The Cordoba Center will later be renamed Park51.) Jones, accompanied by Houston evangelist K.A. Paul, announces that he will give Rauf two hours to answer his questions about relocating the Cordoba Center to a different location. “This challenge goes to the imam in New York,” Jones says at a hastily called press conference. “We would like to make an announcement to give a challenge to the imam in New York.” Paul, the head of the evangelical Global Peace Initiative, says: “[T]here is a confusion going on. We want to clear that confusion to find out if he has agreed to move the mosque from Ground Zero.” Neither Jones nor Paul indicate what, if anything, they will do if they do not hear from Rauf. Rauf does not contact the two and Paul says in response: “The last two days I have been in much prayer with Pastor Terry Jones. I asked the pastor not to burn the Korans, and I ask the imam not to build the mosque at Ground Zero. The pastor has agreed in principle” not to burn the Korans. Paul confirms that Jones will not burn a Koran as he had originally planned. Jones’s son Luke Jones, a youth pastor at their church, tells reporters that Paul is only speaking for himself. “There will be no Koran-burning tomorrow,” he says. “I can’t speak for the future.” Jones did not make a meeting with Rauf a condition of not burning a Koran during a morning interview on NBC, but said then that “God is telling us to stop.” Luke Jones and assistant pastors Wayne Sapp and Stephanie Sapp appear at the press conference wearing sidearms. Luke Jones says they are armed to defend themselves from people who have issued death threats: “The FBI’s been here four times. They told us the threats are very severe and we need to take them very seriously.” After the press conference, the Westboro Baptist Church of Topeka, which routinely conducts anti-gay protests at the funerals of US servicemembers (see October 14, 1998), says it now plans to hold a burning of both a Koran and a US flag. [USA Today, 9/10/2010] Jones has also received calls from Defense Secretary Robert Gates and General David Petraeus, commander of US forces in the Middle East, warning him that to burn the Koran would endanger US troops in combat zones in Afghanistan and Iraq (see September 6, 2010 and September 9, 2010). [Christian Science Monitor, 4/1/2011] Jones will later blame Rauf’s failure to meet with him as the reason for his decision to go ahead and burn a Koran (see March 20, 2011). [Daily Mail, 4/2/2011]

Entity Tags: K.A. Paul, Dove World Outreach Center, David Petraeus, Feisal Abdul Rauf, Westboro Baptist Church, Stephanie Sapp, Terry Jones (pastor), Park51, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Luke Jones, Robert M. Gates, Wayne Sapp

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

A Koran burns in a firepit after being set alight by Reverend Wayne Sapp of the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville, Florida.A Koran burns in a firepit after being set alight by Reverend Wayne Sapp of the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville, Florida. [Source: PI Bill Warner (.com)]An assistant pastor of a Gainesville, Florida, church ceremonially burns a Koran after a “mock trial” that finds the Koran “guilty” of promoting terrorism and crimes against women and minorities (see July 12, 2010 and After). The “trial” is conducted by the Dove World Outreach Center’s head pastor, Terry Jones; assistant pastor Wayne Sapp actually conducts the Koran-burning, setting the Koran afire using a grill lighter and allowing it to burn for 10 minutes. An imam from Dallas serves as the Koran’s “defense attorney” in the “trial.” Jones finds the Koran “guilty” of “training and promoting terrorist activities… death, rape, torture of people worldwide,” and crimes against women and minorities, and orders the book to be burned in what appears to be a preordained outcome. The church streams a video of the burning over the Internet. Luke Jones, Terry Jones’s son and the youth pastor at the church, says the burning is not disrespectful to Islam and is a “symbolic protest” of the “evil” religion. “It’s an act of demonstration,” he says. “Every day, Bibles get burned, flags get burned. Every day, there’s a protest against governments, politics, and some of those protests, some of those demonstrations… express concerns, they express worries, they express certain fears. That has nothing to do with actions and violence. You can’t use that as an excuse so someone can physically go around killing people.” At the time of the burning, signs outside the church read, “Protesting Sharia & jihad Dearborn, MI” (an apparent reference to the large Muslim community in Dearborn, Michigan), and “Islam is of the devil.” After the burning, someone defaces the signs to read, “Love all men.” [Gainesville Sun, 4/1/2011; Christian Science Monitor, 4/1/2011; Daily Mail, 4/2/2011] The incident sparks a bloody protest in Afghanistan that will result in multiple deaths, including the murder of seven UN staffers and guards (see April 1, 2011 and April 1-5, 2011). Jones and Sapp had publicly promised to never burn a Koran after canceling previous plans to do so (see September 9-10, 2010).

Entity Tags: Terry Jones (pastor), Dove World Outreach Center, Luke Jones, Wajid Khuddus, Wayne Sapp

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

Pastor Terry Jones, whose recent burning of a Koran (see March 20, 2011) sparked protests that have cost dozens of lives (see April 1, 2011 and April 1-5, 2011), announces that he now plans to conduct a “trial” of the Prophet Muhammad. Jones and his associate pastor Wayne Sapp conducted a “mock trial” of the Koran that led to their burning of the holy book. Imam Muhammad Musri, the president of the Islamic Society of Central Florida who has attempted to work with Jones to prevent his Koran-burning (see September 9-10, 2010), says he was outraged by Jones’s burning of the Koran and calls him “a nut job.” Jones says he has no interest in causing further violence or in promoting his small Gainesville, Florida, church, saying: “We are actually not doing it because we desire to be killed, we are not doing it because we desire publicity. We really believe our message is that important, that the radical element of Islam is a danger to our society.” Muslims in and around Gainesville worry that Jones’s further actions may cause violent repercussions. [Orlando Sentinel, 4/5/2011; Huffington Post, 4/6/2011]

Entity Tags: Muhammad Musri, Wayne Sapp, Terry Jones (pastor)

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

The Islamic Center of America.The Islamic Center of America. [Source: Annenberg Digital News]Pastor Terry Jones plans to go to Dearborn, Michigan, home of a large and active American Muslim community, to take part in a Good Friday anti-Islam rally outside Dearborn’s largest mosque, the Islamic Center of America. Jones and his congregation recently burned a Koran (see March 20, 2011), and protests against his action have cost dozens of lives (see April 1, 2011 and April 1-5, 2011). Religious leaders from Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, and other religious groups plan a counterprotest that will drown out Jones’s anti-Islamic message with one of unity. The clergy and others plan to link hands in a circle around the mosque to symbolically shield it from Jones. The leaders of these groups call Jones divisive. Reverend Daniel Buttry, a Baptist minister, says, “This is an opportunity to show a different vision than the one he’s bringing.” Jones’s associate pastor Wayne Sapp, who applied the flame to the Koran in the March 20 ceremony, says he and Jones will come to Dearborn to peacefully protest against jihad and Shari’a law, which they say threaten non-Muslims with violence. Jones has said that Muslims are welcome in the US if they remain peaceful and submit to the Constitution. “Who is he to question our loyalty?” says Imam Hassan Qazwini, a Shi’a cleric known for his moderate views and the head of the Islamic Center. “Muslims are as American as he is. He has no right to question the loyalty of American Muslims in this country. We are peaceful, patriotic citizens who love this country and care about it as much as any citizen.” Under Qazwini, the mosque has conducted intensive interfaith and community outreach efforts. Robert Bruttell of the Interfaith Leadership Council of Metropolitan Detroit encourages people of all faiths to take part in the counterprotest. “Stand together in the spirit of cooperation and harmony, the essential basis of this great country,” he says. “We are calling on people to reject fear and intolerance.” The Reverend Jeffery Day of the Archdiocese of Detroit says Jones’s choice of Good Friday to protest is especially offensive: “As Catholics, we’re mortified that Terry Jones would want to come to Dearborn, where we really are a community that gets along well with our Muslim brothers and sisters.” Frank Fiorello, the leader of an anti-Islamic group called Order of the Dragon, originally organized the protest outside the Islamic Center but has since withdrawn his participation after being informed by Dearborn Mayor John O’Reilly and local pastors that Dearborn is not under Shari’a law, a myth promulgated on some Web sites. Fiorello calls Islam a “violent” religion and says, “There’s nothing holy about the Koran.” He named his group after a medieval Christian group that fought against Turkish Muslims; he also plays in a rock band that sings songs describing how they will kill Muslims, and once wrote, “I want to throw a pig head into a Friday prayer night at ye ole mosque of terror.” Of Jones’s Koran-burning, Richard Nodel of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Metropolitan Detroit says: “The desecrating of holy scripture of any faith is reprehensible. When it’s done by a member of the clergy, it’s sinful. We urge Rev. Jones to cancel this despicable act. His hatred and actions are not welcome in our community.” Qazwini acknowledges that Jones “has the right to express his opinion,” but adds that religious leaders should be more sensitive about such issues. “If he calls himself a reverend, a pastor, a religious leader, then we should hold him to a higher standard.” [Detroit Free Press, 4/20/2011; Detroit Free Press, 4/20/2011] Shortly after the Good Friday protest, Jones will be questioned after “accidentally” firing his gun outside a Southfield television studio. Police reports will say that he dropped the .40 caliber handgun while entering his vehicle, a Ford Taurus, and the gun fired a bullet through the floorboard. He and his companion both have valid Florida concealed-carry permits, which are recognized in Michigan. [Detroit Free Press, 4/23/2010]

Entity Tags: Jeffery Day, Daniel Buttry, Frank Fiorello, Islamic Center of America, Robert Bruttell, John O’Reilly, Wayne Sapp, Hassan Qazwini, Richard Nodel, Terry Jones (pastor)

Timeline Tags: US Domestic Terrorism

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